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Hersteller INFOS

Ion Channel Protein Antibodies

Info

StressMarq has introduced a set of excellent monoclonal antibodies for detection of ion channel proteins.

August 2010: New StressMarq Antibodies!
July 2010: New StressMarq Antibodies!
April 2010: New StressMarq Antibodies!
Februrary 2010: Biomol has lowered prices of all StressMarq antibodies and proteins by ~ 10%!

Product Listing


Antigen Application Species Reactivity Catalog # Size
BK Beta2 WB, IP, IHC Human, Mouse, Rat SMC-331D 100 µg
BK Beta3 WB, IP, IHC Human, Mouse, Rat SMC-330D 100 µg
Cav Beta1 WB, IP, IHC Human, Mouse, Rat SMC-317D 100 µg
Cav Beta2 WB, IP, IHC Human, Mouse, Rat SMC-332D 100 µg
Cav Beta4 WB, IP, IHC Human, Mouse, Rat SMC-318D 100 µg
Cav1.2 WB, IP, IHC Human, Mouse, Rat SMC-300D 100 µg
Cav1.3 WB, IP, ICC Human, Mouse, Rat SMC-301D 100 µg
Cav1.3 WB, IP, ICC Human, Mouse, Rat SMC-302D 100 µg
Cav3.2 WB, IP, ICC Human SMC-303D 100 µg
Chapsyn-110 (PSD93) WB, IP, IHC Human (weak), Mouse, Rat SMC-325D 100 µg
GABA(A)R, Alpha1 WB, ICC Human, Mouse, Rat SMC-346D 100 µg
GABA(A)R, Beta1 WB, ICC Human, Mouse, Rat SMC-340D 100 µg
GABA(A)R, Delta WB, ICC Mouse, Rat SMC-345D 100 µg
HCN1 WB, IP, IHC Human, Mouse, Rat SMC-304D 100 µg
HCN2 WB, IP, IHC Mouse, Rat SMC-305D 100 µg
HCN3 WB, ICC, IHC Mouse, Rat SMC-306D 100 µg
HCN4 WB, ICC, IHC Human, Mouse, Rat SMC-320D 100 µg
KCNQ1 WB, IP, IHC Human, Mouse, Rat SMC-307D 100 µg
KCNQ2 WB, IP, IHC Human, Mouse, Rat SMC-308D 100 µg
KCNQ4 WB, IP, ICC Human, Mouse, Rat SMC-309D 100 µg
Kir2.1 WB, IHC Human, Mouse, Rat SMC-310D 100 µg
Kir2.2 WB, IHC Human, Mouse, Rat SMC-311D 100 µg
Kir2.3 WB, IHC Human, Mouse, Rat SMC-312D 100 µg
KV3.1 WB, IHC Human (weak), Mouse, Rat SMC-313D 100 µg
KV3.4 WB, IHC, IP Human, Mouse, Rat SMC-335D 100 µg
Nav1.7 WB, IP, ICC Human, Mouse, Rat SMC-314D 100 µg
Nav1.8 WB, IHC, ICC Human, Mouse, Rat SMC-342D 100 µg
NR2B WB, IHC, IP Human, Mouse, Rat SMC-337D 100 µg
Slo2.1 (Slick) WB, IHC Mouse, Rat SMC-324D 100 µg
Slo2.2 (Slack) WB, IHC Human (weak), Mouse, Rat SMC-323D 100 µg
Slo2.3 WB, ICC (mouse sperm) Mouse SMC-326D 100 µg
TrpC4 WB, IP, ICC Human, Mouse, Rat SMC-315D 100 µg
TrpC7 WB, IP, IHC Human, Mouse, Rat SMC-343D 100 µg
TrpM7 WB, IP, ICC Human, Mouse, Rat SMC-316D 100 µg
TrpV3 WB, ICC, IP Human, Mouse, Rat SMC-334D 100 µg
TrpV3 WB, ICC, IP Human, Mouse, Rat SMC-319D 100 µg


Background Information


Ion channels are integral membrane proteins that help establish and control the small voltage gradient across the plasma membrane of living cells by allowing the flow of ions down their electrochemical gradient. They are present in the membranes that surround all biological cells because their main function is to regulate the flow of ions across this membrane. Whereas some ion channels permit the passage of ions based on charge, others conduct based on a ionic species, such as sodium or potassium. Furthermore, in some ion channels, the passage is governed by a gate which is controlled by chemical or electrical signals, temperature, or mechanical forces.

There are a few main classifications of gated ion channels. There are voltage-gated ion channels, ligand-gated, other gating systems and finally those that are classified differently, having more exotic characteristics. The first are voltage- gated ion channels which open and close in response to membrane potential. These are then separated into sodium, calcium, potassium, proton, transient receptor, and cyclic nucleotide gated channels; each of which is responsible for a unique role. Ligand-gated ion channels are also known as ionotropic receptors, and they open in response to specific ligand molecules binding to the extracellular domain of the receptor protein. The other gated classifications include activation and inactivation by second messengers, inward rectifier potassium channels, calcium-activated potassium channels, two-pore-domain potassium channels, light-gated channels, mechano-sensitive ion channels and cyclic nucleotide-gated channels. Finally, the other classifications are based on less normal characteristics such as two-pore channels, and transient receptor potential channels.

Anti-BKβ2 Channel


BK channels contribute to electrical impulses, proper signal transmission of information and regulation of neurotransmitter release. A gain of function mutation in the pore-forming alpha subunit of the BK channel was linked to human neurological diseases. Findings suggest that the distribution of the beta subunits in the brain can modulate the BK channels to contribute to the pathophysiology of epilepsy and dyskinesia. This has major implications on other physiological processes in tissues other than the brain.

Anti-BKβ3 Channel


BK channels contribute to electrical impulses, proper signal transmission of information and regulation of neurotransmitter release. A gain of function mutation in the pore-forming alpha subunit of the BK channel was linked to human neurological diseases. Findings suggest that the distribution of the beta subunits in the brain can modulate the BK channels to contribute to the pathophysiology of epilepsy and dyskinesia. This has major implications on other physiological processes in tissues other than the brain.

Anti-Cavβ1 Ca2+ Channel


Calcium channel, voltage-dependent, beta 1 subunit, also known as CACNB1, is a human gene. The protein encoded by this gene belongs to the calcium channel beta subunit family. It plays an important role in the calcium channel by modulating G protein inhibition, increasing peak calcium current, controlling the alpha-1 subunit membrane targeting and shifting the voltage dependence of activation and inactivation. Alternative splicing occurs at this locus and three transcript variants encoding three distinct isoforms have been identified.

Anti-Cavβ2 Ca2+ Channel


Cav Beta subunits are involved in the transport of the pore forming alpha1 subunit to the plasma membrane. They also shield an ER Retention signal on the alpha1 subunit, thereby guiding the pore-forming subunit to the target membrane. They also determine the biophysical properties of the calcium channel.

Anti-Cavβ4 Ca2+ Channel


This antibody detects a member of the beta subunit family, a protein in the voltage-dependent calcium channel complex. Calcium channels mediate the influx of calcium ions into the cell upon membrane polarization and consist of a complex of alpha-1, alpha-2/delta, beta, and gamma subunits in a 1:1:1:1 ratio. Various versions of each of these subunits exist, either expressed from similar genes or the result of alternative splicing. The protein described in this record plays an important role in calcium channel function by modulating G protein inhibition, increasing peak calcium current, controlling the alpha-1 subunit membrane targeting and shifting the voltage dependence of activation and inactivation. Certain mutations in this gene have been associated with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME). Alternate transcriptional splice variants of this gene, encoding different isoforms, have been characterized.

Anti-Cav1.2 Ca2+ Channel


Cav1.2 is a cardiac L-type calcium channel, and is important for excitation and contraction of the heart. It may be associated with a variant of Long QT syndrome called Timothys syndrome and also with Brugada syndrome. Some references also suggest it is related to bipolar disease as well.

Anti-Cav1.3 Ca2+ Channel


Cav1.3, also known as the calcium channel, voltage-dependent, L type, alpha 1D subunit (CACNA1D), is a human gene. Cav1.3 subunits are primarily expressed in neurons and neuroendocine cells. Some studies suggest however that Cav1.3 is also found in the atria, and may figure prominently in atrial arrhythmias. Cav1.3 also carries the primary sensory receptors of the mammalian cochlea, and are also expressed in the electromotile outer hair cells.

Anti-Cav3.2 Ca2+ Channel


Cav3.2 is a protein which in humans is encoded by the CACNA1H gene. Studies suggest certain mutations in this gene lead to childhood absence epilepsy. Studies also suggest that the up-regulations of Cav3.2 may participate in the progression of prostate cancer toward an androgen-independent stage.

Anti-Chapsyn-110 (PSD93)


Chapsyn-110, is a part of the membrane-associated putative guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family. It binds directly to the NMDA receptor, and Shaker K+ channel subunits, and is 70-80% identical to PSD-95/SAP90 and SAP97 (1). It associated tightly with the postsynaptic density I brain, and mediates the clustering of both NMDA recpetors and K+ channels in heterologous cells. The encoded protein forms a heterodimer with PSD-95 that may interact at postsynaptic sites to form a multimeric scaffold for the clustering of receptors, ion channels, and associated signaling proteins.

Anti-Alpha 1 GABA Receptor


The GABA-A receptor is a member of the superfamily of fast acting ligand-gated ion channels. The individual subunits of these receptors have similar sequences and structural features. GABA-A receptors are the major fast inhibitory neurotransmitter gated ion channels in the brain.

Anti-Beta 1 GABA Receptor


The GABA-A receptor is a member of the superfamily of fast acting ligand-gated ion channels. The individual subunits of these receptors have similar sequences and structural features. GABA-A receptors are the major fast inhibitory neurotransmitter gated ion channels in the brain.

Anti-Delta GABA-A Receptor


The GABA-A receptor is a member of the superfamily of fast acting ligand-gated ion channels. The individual subunits of these receptors have similar sequences and structural features. GABA-A receptors are the major fast inhibitory neurotransmitter gated ion channels in the brain.

Anti-HCN1 Cyclic Nucleotide Gated Channel


Hyperpolarization-activated cation channels of the HCN gene family, such as HCN1, play a crucial role in the regulatons of cell excitability. Importantly, they contribute to spontaneous rhythmic activity in both the heart and brain.

Anti-HCN2 Cyclic Nucleotide Gated Channel


Hyperpolarization-activated cation channels of the HCN gene family contribute to spontaneous rhythmic activity in both the heart and brain.

Anti-HCN3 Cyclic Nucleotide Gated Channel


Hyperpolarization-activated cation channels of the HCN gene family contribute to spontaneous rhythmic activity in both the heart and brain.

Anti-HCN4 Cyclic Nucleotide Gated Channel


Hyperpolarization-activated cation channels of the HCN gene family contribute to spontaneous rhythmic activity in both the heart and brain.

Anti-KCNQ1 K+ Channel


Kv7.1 (KvLQT1) is a potassium channel protein coded for by the gene KCNQ1. Kv7.1 is present in the cell membranes of cardiac muscle tissue and in inner ear neurons among other tissues. In the cardiac cells, Kv7.1 mediates the I_Ks (or slow delayed rectifying K+) current that contributes to the repolarization of the cell, terminating the cardiac action potential and thereby the hearts contraction.

Anti-KCNQ2 K+ Channel


Kv7.2 (KvLQT2) is a potassium channel protein coded for by the gene KCNQ2. It is associated with benign familial neonatal convulsions.

Anti-KCNQ4 K+ Channel


This protein encoded by this gene forms a potassium channel that is thought to play a critical role in the regulation of neuronal excitability, particularly in sensory cells of the cochlea. The current generated by this channel is inhibited by M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors and activated by retigabine, a novel anticonvulsant drug.

Anti-Kir2.1 K+ Channel


The Kir2.1 inward-rectifier potassium ion channel is encoded by the KCNJ2 gene. A defect in this gene is associated with Andersen-Tawil syndrome.

Anti-Kir2.2 K+ Channel


Kir2.2 participates in establishing action potential waveform and excitability of neuronal and muscle tissues. This gene encodes an inwardly rectifying K+ channel which may be blocked by divalent cations. This protein is thought to be one of multiple inwardly rectifying channels which contribute to the cardiac inward rectifier current (IK1). The gene is located within the Smith-Magenis syndrome region on chromosome 17.

Anti-Kir2.3 K+ Channel


Several different potassium channels are known to be involved with electrical signaling in the nervous system. One class is activated by depolarization whereas a second class is not. The latter are referred to as inwardly rectifying K+ channels, and they have a greater tendency to allow potassium to flow into the cell rather than out of it. This asymmetry in potassium ion conductance plays a key role in the excitability of muscle cells and neurons. The protein encoded by this gene is an integral membrane protein and member of the inward rectifier potassium channel family. The encoded protein has a small unitary conductance compared to other members of this protein family. Two transcript variants encoding the same protein have been found for this gene.

Anti-Kv3.1b K+ Channel


Potassium voltage-gated channel, Shaw-related subfamily, member 1, also known as KCNC1 or Kv3.1, is a human gene. The Shaker gene family of Drosophila encodes components of voltage-gated potassium channels and is comprised of four subfamilies. Based on sequence similarity, this gene is similar to one of these subfamilies, namely the Shaw subfamily. The protein encoded by this gene belongs to the delayed rectifier class of channel proteins and is an integral membrane protein that mediates the voltage-dependent potassium ion permeability of excitable membranes. Kv3.1b has been extensively tested in the auditory regions of mammals, and the decline of Kv3.1b expression appears to correlate with the functional decline in the medial olivocochlear efferent system. Other research shows potential for Kv3.1b channels to be oxygen sensors.

Anti-Kv3.4 K+ Channel


Kv3.4, a member of the Shaw subfamily, may play important roles in maintaining normal function of the corneal epithelium. Kv3.4 is also over-expressed in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease, and therefore represents a novel therapeutic target for this disease.

Anti-Nav1.7 Na+ Channel


Nav1.7 is a voltage-gated sodium channel and plays a critical role in the generation and conduction of action potentials and is thus important for electrical signaling by most excitable cells. Therapeutically, the association of pain insensitivity with the loss of function of a certain sodium channel may have implications. Since Nav1.7 is not present in cardiac muscle or neurons in the central nervous system, blockers of Nav1.7 will not have direct action on these cells and thus can have less side effects than current pain medications. By performing more studies, there is a possibility to develop a new generation of drugs that can reduce the pain intensity in animals.

Anti-Nav1.8 Na+ Channel


Nav1.8 is a voltage-gated sodium channel and plays a critical role in the generation and conduction of action potentials and is thus important for electrical signaling by most excitable cells. Therapeutically, the association of pain insensitivity with the loss of function of a certain sodium channel may have implications. Since Nav1.8 is not present in cardiac muscle or neurons in the central nervous system, blockers of Nav1.8 will not have direct action on these cells and thus can have less side effects than current pain medications. By performing more studies, there is a possibility to develop a new generation of drugs that can reduce the pain intensity in animals.

Anti-NR2B glutamate receptor


NR2B containing receptors have been implicated in synaptic plasticity, memory formation and pain modulation. Studies suggest that the NR2B subunit of glutamate receptors may be potential targets for relieving pain; NR2B may be a probable target for anti-nociceptive drugs, and may also be useful as analgesics.

Anti-Slo2.1 (Slick K+ channel)


Slo2.1 is a novel member of the mammalian Slo potassium channel gene family. The slick channel is activated by intracellular Na+ and Cl- and is inhibited by intracellular ATP. It is also widely expressed in the CNS and detected in the heart.

Anti-Slo2.2 (Slack)


Slo2.2 is a novel member of the mammalian Slo potassium channel gene family. Slo2 channels may contribute to the resting potentials of cells that control their basal level of excitability. They also have sensors that couple channel activity to the intracellular concentrations of Na+ and Cl-.

Anti-Slo3


The Slo3 channel is a novel potassium channel abundantly expressed in mammalian speramtocytes- tests have shown that it is expressed in both mouse and human testis. It represents a new and unique type of potassium channel that is regulated by both intracellular pH and membrane voltage. Because of its sensitivity to both pH and voltage, Slo3 may play a role in alkalization-mediated K(+) fluxes associated with sperm capacitation.

Anti-TrpC4 Ion Channel and Ser/Thr Kinase


Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily C, member 4, also known as TRPC4, is a human gene encoding a protein of the same name. They are expressed in smooth muscle and endothelial cells where they regulate membrane potential and calcium influx. TrpC4 is activated by G(q)/phospholipase C-coupled receptors, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Studies suggest TrpC4 contributes to axonal regeneration after nerve injury.

Anti-TrpC7 Ca2+ Channel


Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily C, member 7, also known as TRPC7, is a non-selective cation channel that is directly activated by DAG. TrpC7 shows constitutive activity and susceptibility to negative regulation by extracellular Ca2+. Because of this, TrpC7 plays an important role in the Ca2+ signaling pathway. TrpC7 is also expressed abundantly in the heart, and combined with its ability to act as a Ca2+ channel, TrpC7 might contribute to the process of heart failure.

Anti-TrpM7 Ion Channel and Ser/Thr Kinase


TRPs, mammalian homologs of the Drosophila transient receptor potential (trp) protein, are ion channels that are thought to mediate capacitative calcium entry into the cell. TRP-PLIK is a protein that is both an ion channel and a kinase. As a channel, it conducts calcium and monovalent cations to depolarize cells and increase intracellular calcium. As a kinase, it is capable of phosphorylating itself and other substrates. The kinase activity is necessary for channel function, as shown by its dependence on intracellular ATP and by the kinase mutants.

Anti-TrpV3 Cation Channel


The TRPV3 protein belongs to a family of nonselective cation channels that function in a variety of processes, including temperature sensation and vasoregulation. The thermosensitive members of this family are expressed in subsets of sensory neurons that terminate in the skin, and are activated at distinct physiological temperatures. This channel is activated at temperatures between 22 and 40 degrees C. The gene lies in close proximity to another family member (TRPV1) gene on chromosome 17, and the two encoded proteins are thought to associate with each other to form heteromeric channels.

Download this info as four paged pdf document (105 kB): Ion Channel Protein Antibodies

See also: PhosphoSolutions Neuroscience Antibodies for Immunohistochemistry
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